The Ultimate Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards

Posted in Surfing on July 20th, 2010

Surfboard Shack.com’s Idiot’s Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards is perfect for the budget surfer who doesn’t mind spending a bit more time packing their surfboard. For those that have the cash and want to save on time you can always pad your surfboard with the same foam shown below and buy one of those durable surfboard bags instead.

You can pick up all the necessary packing supplies at your local shipping, packing, or surfboard supply store for around $40.

Surfboard Shipping & Packing

Surfboard Packing List:

Surfboard box
Packing tape
Plastic bagging
Packing foam (sheets)
Bubble wrap (optional)
Utility knife

Step 1: Cut off the boxes’ excess length. IMPORTANT NOTE: Make sure you only cut one end of the box so you preserve one set of folding flaps (used to seal the box – see photo below).

How much excess should I cut off?

Step 2: You’ll want about 2" of space on each end of the box from the nose and tail of your board and the extra space needed to cut the folding flaps on one the end. Measure the height of the existing flaps to see how much extra you’ll need before you cut the excess off the other end.

Step 3: Once you’ve downsized your box on one side only), cut your folding flaps on the end you just cut.

Step 4: Tear your foam strips into 24 inch wide sheets so each sheet can be folded in half.

Step 5: Slip your surfboards into a plastic bag which will prevent them from getting that nasty adhesive residue left by packing tape then cinch both ends of the plastic bag either with tie wraps or a knot.

Step 6: Wrap both ends with packing tape so your board doesn’t move around in the plastic bag.

Step 7: Fold a 24 inch wide foam sheet in half and tape to the top of the board that will sit on the bottom of the box.

Step 8: Place your second board directly on top (make sure your second board also has its own plastic bag) and tape the two boards together.

Step 9: Take your 24 inch wide foam sheet and fold in half once again. Wrap the rails of BOTH boards with your sheet of foam and packing tape and make sure that the foam wraps around both boards so that the top and bottom of your ‘board sandwich’ are protected.

Step 10: Take another 24 inch wide foam sheet and begin wrapping the nose and tail as shown in the photo below.

Step 11: Fold in half and tape down the extra foam sheets to the top and bottom of your boards.

Step 12: Insert your packed ‘board sandwich’ into the box and stuff both ends of the box with shirts, jackets, towels, or extra foam/bubble wrap. Make sure that you’ve padded the box so that your board doesn’t move around.

Step 13: Seal the box with packing tape and be sure to use one of those red fragile stickers.

Secret Tip: I highly recommend using a handle bar to carry your box through the airport. You can buy something similar at the store but I actually make my handle bar out of tape (see photos below).


read the full article »

The Ultimate Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards

Posted in Surfing on July 20th, 2010

Surfboard Shack.com’s Idiot’s Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards is perfect for the budget surfer who doesn’t mind spending a bit more time packing their surfboard. For those that have the cash and want to save on time you can always pad your surfboard with the same foam shown below and buy one of those durable surfboard bags instead.

You can pick up all the necessary packing supplies at your local shipping, packing, or surfboard supply store for around $40.

Surfboard Shipping & Packing

Surfboard Packing List:

Surfboard box
Packing tape
Plastic bagging
Packing foam (sheets)
Bubble wrap (optional)
Utility knife

Step 1: Cut off the boxes’ excess length. IMPORTANT NOTE: Make sure you only cut one end of the box so you preserve one set of folding flaps (used to seal the box – see photo below).

How much excess should I cut off?

Step 2: You’ll want about 2" of space on each end of the box from the nose and tail of your board and the extra space needed to cut the folding flaps on one the end. Measure the height of the existing flaps to see how much extra you’ll need before you cut the excess off the other end.

Step 3: Once you’ve downsized your box on one side only), cut your folding flaps on the end you just cut.

Step 4: Tear your foam strips into 24 inch wide sheets so each sheet can be folded in half.

Step 5: Slip your surfboards into a plastic bag which will prevent them from getting that nasty adhesive residue left by packing tape then cinch both ends of the plastic bag either with tie wraps or a knot.

Step 6: Wrap both ends with packing tape so your board doesn’t move around in the plastic bag.

Step 7: Fold a 24 inch wide foam sheet in half and tape to the top of the board that will sit on the bottom of the box.

Step 8: Place your second board directly on top (make sure your second board also has its own plastic bag) and tape the two boards together.

Step 9: Take your 24 inch wide foam sheet and fold in half once again. Wrap the rails of BOTH boards with your sheet of foam and packing tape and make sure that the foam wraps around both boards so that the top and bottom of your ‘board sandwich’ are protected.

Step 10: Take another 24 inch wide foam sheet and begin wrapping the nose and tail as shown in the photo below.

Step 11: Fold in half and tape down the extra foam sheets to the top and bottom of your boards.

Step 12: Insert your packed ‘board sandwich’ into the box and stuff both ends of the box with shirts, jackets, towels, or extra foam/bubble wrap. Make sure that you’ve padded the box so that your board doesn’t move around.

Step 13: Seal the box with packing tape and be sure to use one of those red fragile stickers.

Secret Tip: I highly recommend using a handle bar to carry your box through the airport. You can buy something similar at the store but I actually make my handle bar out of tape (see photos below).


read the full article »

The Ultimate Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards

Posted in Surfing on July 20th, 2010

Surfboard Shack.com’s Idiot’s Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards is perfect for the budget surfer who doesn’t mind spending a bit more time packing their surfboard. For those that have the cash and want to save on time you can always pad your surfboard with the same foam shown below and buy one of those durable surfboard bags instead.

You can pick up all the necessary packing supplies at your local shipping, packing, or surfboard supply store for around $40.

Surfboard Shipping & Packing

Surfboard Packing List:

Surfboard box
Packing tape
Plastic bagging
Packing foam (sheets)
Bubble wrap (optional)
Utility knife

Step 1: Cut off the boxes’ excess length. IMPORTANT NOTE: Make sure you only cut one end of the box so you preserve one set of folding flaps (used to seal the box – see photo below).

How much excess should I cut off?

Step 2: You’ll want about 2" of space on each end of the box from the nose and tail of your board and the extra space needed to cut the folding flaps on one the end. Measure the height of the existing flaps to see how much extra you’ll need before you cut the excess off the other end.

Step 3: Once you’ve downsized your box on one side only), cut your folding flaps on the end you just cut.

Step 4: Tear your foam strips into 24 inch wide sheets so each sheet can be folded in half.

Step 5: Slip your surfboards into a plastic bag which will prevent them from getting that nasty adhesive residue left by packing tape then cinch both ends of the plastic bag either with tie wraps or a knot.

Step 6: Wrap both ends with packing tape so your board doesn’t move around in the plastic bag.

Step 7: Fold a 24 inch wide foam sheet in half and tape to the top of the board that will sit on the bottom of the box.

Step 8: Place your second board directly on top (make sure your second board also has its own plastic bag) and tape the two boards together.

Step 9: Take your 24 inch wide foam sheet and fold in half once again. Wrap the rails of BOTH boards with your sheet of foam and packing tape and make sure that the foam wraps around both boards so that the top and bottom of your ‘board sandwich’ are protected.

Step 10: Take another 24 inch wide foam sheet and begin wrapping the nose and tail as shown in the photo below.

Step 11: Fold in half and tape down the extra foam sheets to the top and bottom of your boards.

Step 12: Insert your packed ‘board sandwich’ into the box and stuff both ends of the box with shirts, jackets, towels, or extra foam/bubble wrap. Make sure that you’ve padded the box so that your board doesn’t move around.

Step 13: Seal the box with packing tape and be sure to use one of those red fragile stickers.

Secret Tip: I highly recommend using a handle bar to carry your box through the airport. You can buy something similar at the store but I actually make my handle bar out of tape (see photos below).


read the full article »

The Ultimate Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards

Posted in Surfing on July 20th, 2010

Surfboard Shack.com’s Idiot’s Guide to Packing & Shipping Surfboards is perfect for the budget surfer who doesn’t mind spending a bit more time packing their surfboard. For those that have the cash and want to save on time you can always pad your surfboard with the same foam shown below and buy one of those durable surfboard bags instead.

You can pick up all the necessary packing supplies at your local shipping, packing, or surfboard supply store for around $40.

Surfboard Shipping & Packing

Surfboard Packing List:

Surfboard box
Packing tape
Plastic bagging
Packing foam (sheets)
Bubble wrap (optional)
Utility knife

Step 1: Cut off the boxes’ excess length. IMPORTANT NOTE: Make sure you only cut one end of the box so you preserve one set of folding flaps (used to seal the box – see photo below).

How much excess should I cut off?

Step 2: You’ll want about 2" of space on each end of the box from the nose and tail of your board and the extra space needed to cut the folding flaps on one the end. Measure the height of the existing flaps to see how much extra you’ll need before you cut the excess off the other end.

Step 3: Once you’ve downsized your box on one side only), cut your folding flaps on the end you just cut.

Step 4: Tear your foam strips into 24 inch wide sheets so each sheet can be folded in half.

Step 5: Slip your surfboards into a plastic bag which will prevent them from getting that nasty adhesive residue left by packing tape then cinch both ends of the plastic bag either with tie wraps or a knot.

Step 6: Wrap both ends with packing tape so your board doesn’t move around in the plastic bag.

Step 7: Fold a 24 inch wide foam sheet in half and tape to the top of the board that will sit on the bottom of the box.

Step 8: Place your second board directly on top (make sure your second board also has its own plastic bag) and tape the two boards together.

Step 9: Take your 24 inch wide foam sheet and fold in half once again. Wrap the rails of BOTH boards with your sheet of foam and packing tape and make sure that the foam wraps around both boards so that the top and bottom of your ‘board sandwich’ are protected.

Step 10: Take another 24 inch wide foam sheet and begin wrapping the nose and tail as shown in the photo below.

Step 11: Fold in half and tape down the extra foam sheets to the top and bottom of your boards.

Step 12: Insert your packed ‘board sandwich’ into the box and stuff both ends of the box with shirts, jackets, towels, or extra foam/bubble wrap. Make sure that you’ve padded the box so that your board doesn’t move around.

Step 13: Seal the box with packing tape and be sure to use one of those red fragile stickers.

Secret Tip: I highly recommend using a handle bar to carry your box through the airport. You can buy something similar at the store but I actually make my handle bar out of tape (see photos below).


read the full article »

Kapi’olani Community College Farmers Market

Posted in Food & Dining on May 19th, 2010

Looking for a delicious way to start your weekend? Visit the Saturday morning Farmer’s Market at Kapi’olani Community College. The market features a variety of Hawaiian grown and produced foods available only here. You will find the bustling market crowded with local shoppers and tourists alike. Here are 10 tips to make your visit more enjoyable:

1. Start early. At 7:30 a.m. you will hear an air horn blare and know the market has officially opened. The best selection is available first thing in the morning, and vendors often sell out at this popular market.

2. Take the bus. The small parking lot is packed early in the morning. The best bet is to take The Bus to the stop in front of the college. If you are a walker, enjoy a pleasant hike from Waikiki, uphill to the college and downhill on your return.

3. BYOB. Go green and bring your own reusable shopping bags or wheeled carts to carry your purchases home. Cloth bags are sturdier than plastic, while reducing trash and energy consumption.

4. Bring cash. Leave your charge cards and traveler’s checks at home. This is a green zone, cash only. Prices are not cheap.

5. Enjoy the variety. Just picked salad greens, ripe heirloom tomatos, sea vegetables, corn on the cob, Kona coffee, poke, fresh bread and kettle corn are just a few of the items to peruse. Select tropical orchids and exotic Bird of Paradise flowers to add rainbows of color to your home.

6. Taste something new. Many vendors offer samples so you can become familiar with new items. Be open to trying different foods and products, and you may find a new favorite dish. Sweet honey, fresh lavender, pesto pizza, and tangy seaweed salads will tempt your senses.

7. Ask questions. If you have a question or are curious, just ask. Many of the companies represented are small family owned businesses. The owners are proud of their products and delight in telling you about their goods.

8. Come hungry. While you sample goodies, save room for some hearty fare. Cosmopolitan cooked to order snacks and meals will tempt your senses. Egyptian curried tofu, Portuguese sausage and eggs, Spam and rice loco moco plates flavors waft through the aisles. Be sure to check out the bakery goods.

9. Sit tight. A lone picnic table is available for dining on a first come basis. If you are lucky to get a spot, be prepared to share the community table with others. Take this opportunity to meet residents and tourists alike at the table and learn about neighborhood gems only locals know about.

10. People watch. The crowd is as diverse as the products at the market. Just listen, and you will hear a cornucopia of languages spoken by your fellow shoppers. Bus loads of Japanese and other tourists unload curious shoppers. People watching is as interesting as shopping at this market.


Watch as we tour the Kapi’olani Community College Farmer’s Market


Kapi’olani Community College Farmers Market

Photo Credit: (_e.t) / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Kapi’olani Community College Farmer’s Market is a year round Saturday morning treat. Get out early for the best choice of locally produced foods, flowers and products. Stock up and you will be able to enjoy the fresh flavors throughout the week.

Kapiolani Community College Saturday Farmer’s Market

Parking Lot C (Off of Diamond Head Road)

4303 Diamond Head Road

Honolulu, HI 96816-4421 Map
Every Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
http://kapiolani.hawaii.edu/object/farmersmarket.html

About this guest blogger:
April M. Williams is a frequent visitor to Hawaii and a great friend of 808Talk. She is also the author of the book “Social Networking Throughout Your Career”, available in paperback and on the Kindle.

Learn more about April by visiting her at the websites below.
LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/in/aprilmwilliams
Twitter http://twitter.com/AprilMWilliams
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AprilMWilliams
CyberLife Tutors Blog http://www.cyberlifetutors.com/blog.html
Personal Blog http://aprilmwilliams.wordpress.com


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